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as he tribesmen another see the u.s., for instance you would see them as an al qaeda member. the u.s. thinks it's killing an al qaeda member and maybe it is. but he's been a killed on the ground and yemenis seen being killed is in fact the tribesman. this is a challenge that the u.s. obama administration not released all and i would argue that the drones in the airstrikes have not actually solve the problem and they've actually exacerbated the problem the great deal. so not to go on too long, but just let me close with this last scenario. after the christmas day attack 2009, president obama asked his staff to imagine what would happen if al qaeda had been successful and i think that's a very good exercise. and if today al qaeda were able to carry out an attack, even a fairly small one not on the scale of september 11th, but on the scale of christmas day 2009, with the u.s. respond? many people, put myself into a large-scale renovation of yemen would be mistaken that the u.s. has been bombing them and for the past three years and it really doesn't seem to have had the impact of the u.
>>> booktv recently sought with michael skerker of the u.s. naval academy to talk about his book an ethics of interrogation. this interview is part of book tv's college series. it's about 20 minutes. >> you are watching book tv on c-span2. one of the things we do in booktv is visit campuses around the country. it gives us a chance to talk with professors who are also authors and today we are at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland and joining us is the author of this book, michael skerker an ethics of interrogation is the name of the book. published by the university of chicago press. professor skerker, what do you do with theb academy? >> i teach the ethics class all the youngsters have to take and a number to loss of one studies to request to reduce the ethics of interrogation in your book is the philosophical books worth how to interrogate?y >> guest: >> it is the principal question number one circumstances can the state asked.yyyyyyy then there are some practical dos and don'ts as well. >> what is the geneva convention that we always talk about? spec the gene
.m. eastern. >> through election day, what are coverage. coming up next, the u.s. air relations. including the discussion of the relationship between u.s., israel, and iran. then we will hear the "washington post" cybersecurity summit. we have several live events to tell you about tomorrow. gregorie dinero will be on to discuss the future of the army. and president obama's campaign rally at the university of colorado, boulder. that is on c-span. [cheers] [applause] >> all right, let's get what documents the coolidge family during the white house years. and also before. >> part of the coolidge family papers. we have one box of photographs. then we have several boxes of other documents. photographs are heavy. the album should be in the back here. here it is. unfortunately, it is on lack civics paper. there's not much we can do about that because we don't want to change the artifact nature of the album itself. starting to crack, some of these pages are separating. this is a photograph of calvin coolidge the day before he became president. he was in plymouth, vermont, visiting his father, doin
's a double feature this afternoon, and i have the privilege of also introducing to you our next speaker, u.s. senator-elect ted cruz from texas. it was two years ago when ted cruz came up to me and others here in this room saying he was contemplating a run for the u.s. senate and asked for reaction. trying hard not to pour water over ted's noble commitment to public service, i resisted what would roll out of our topings -- tongues when a friend confronts us with advise. are you crazy? do you have a fever? have you sought professional help for this behavior? [laughter] taking a slightly different tact, i asked the usual questions. is it the right time politically? do you think the money's there? is your family prepared for this? have you checked all the necessary boxes back home in texas? now, as any of you know ted would guess, looked reflective and discerning at the questions, but you knew he was optimistic and just raring to go. he wanted to do this. from the experiences with the bush campaign and his bid for attorney regime, he knew he was ready for the political fray, and while he probab
the coaches and even leaks because many of the links i work with our code. they are not governed by u.s.a. football for pop warner. these guys can't come down. scott can't come until every coach in the united states of america this is the way you need to do it. so what we try to do at the league had to share this as an example that this is what you're fighting with the aggressors level is number one, coach kerri campbell and i went to a lake. we said this. you know i want to do? we played at the highest level, so there is a model standard. authority out there. the nfl authority set a standard for youth coaches in america. the problem is they don't embrace the changes because it's all about winning. win at all costs mentality. winning is good, but nobody remembers years from now. what matters is the effects of the game. so what we tried to do was, okay, if you guys want to improve safety and you want to improve coming you know, making sure coaches are responsiblefor me being accountable and credible, then implement the leagues are just like the nfl pa. they protect the west players. they
elections. as well as a growing pressure from congress as will some u.s. allies in the region against diplomacy. focus shifted to sanctions and tehran responded by further expanding its nuclear program leaving both sides worse off today than they were a few years ago. in the meantime, sanctions have held iranian middle class for the impoverished population while the regime's repression and human rights abuses have continued to intensify and its nuclear program has continued to expand. but a new window for opportunity for diplomacy has opened through obama's convincing real election, and in the next few months, up until the iranian new year, both sides enjoy maximum political space and maneuverability to negotiate effectively. the logic of diplomacy is obvious. it's the only option that can truly resolve the issue. sanctions can cripple iran's economy at the expense of destiny that pro-democracy movement there, but sanctions alone cannot resolve this issue. the military option can set back the program for a year or two but only at the expense of ensuring that eventually iran eventually
u.s. ambassador to pakistan the ambassador to the united states and former adviser to hillary clinton. hosted by the world affairs council of america, this is 45 minutes. [applause] >> is a great pleasure to be here with such a great panel, three ambassadors and one globally renowned journalist and scholars. so i've been told there have been a lot of questions about pakistan and afghanistan so far and i think we have a first-rate panel to start dealing with them. what i'm going to do in terms of focusing the discussion is i'm going to key off with questions to each of our panelists, one each and allow for a little bit of follow up and then i will open the floor to use and you will have more time to engage with them. let me begin with ambassador munter. you already got his bio, but i think in some ways he is almost uniquely positioned to provide us a very recent perspective on what pakistan looks like in the united states to official american advisers and diplomats and also the u.s. pakistan relationship during what was an exceedingly difficult and trying time which is no refle
it with the discipline i come from an information technology career of over 30 years. i worked at u.s. special operations command as the director of the staff i know what it takes to get this stuff done, and five years, gentleman is totally unacceptable. and i don't really have a question for you. i just want you to fix this for crying out loud. >> can i respond? congressmen coming you and i but primarily roger baker and you have had this discussion. i work with you and we believe we have the good mark on architecture and i haven't satisfied you. we will come back and work on it again. >> mr. turner? >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for being here. i appreciate your leadership i want to particularly thank you for your work on sexual assault which and you were working on with the secretary of the va in your efforts to change the culture throughout the dod to prevent sexual assault and assist the victims. the members have been of service members and families transition and out of the military secretary panetta of the most important things transition with a family is obviously that raises the issue of
a chance to talk with professors who are also authors, and today we are at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis to maryland. joining us is the author of this book, michael skerker, an ethics of interrogation is the name of the book published by the university of chicago press. professor, first of all, what do you do at the naval academy? >> i am an ethicist. to see at this glass that all the answers have to take in some upper levels las, religiousyy studies and that they courses. >> would you say your book is a philosophical book or a how to interrogate book? >> it is a work of philosophy. the principal question is under what circumstances can a statey ask more demand to know the secrets of its citizens.y there are some practical dos and don'ts as well. >> what is the geneva convention that we always talk about? >> the geneva convention to protect pow's signed in 1948. >> and how did that come about? what will does it play inyyy interrogation?yyyyyyy >> sure.yyyyyyyy throughout much of the historyy of warfare, prisoners-of-waryy were treated at the mercy
is president and ceo of the windstream corporation, he is also chairman this year of the u.s. telecom trade association. he's been our guest on "the communicators" along with paul barbagallo of bloomberg. gentlemen, thank you. >> guest: thank you. >> just ahead, a series of discussions by the world affairs council of america exploring national security issues facing the u.s. up first, former national security adviser steven hadley. he talks about the economic impact on national security. then a panel of former ambassadors discusses relations between the u.s. and pakistan. after that former middle east envoy dennis ross talks about iran, israel and u.s./middle east policy. and later, a look at the aftermath of the arab spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiativ
in the southwest, been in the u.s. since the was basically took half of mexico. and the new latino population which is foreign-born, 40% foreign-born, and the rest of the children of immigrants. very conservative. i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary, but sometimes we get tangled, caught up with polls. resort have seen in this election cycle. and i think with latinos we cite polling with specific issues but is that a better understanding of where they're coming from you will get an understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. but i believe with the latino community, we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we would have a better position on immigration, from the get-go, from the primary governor romney would've been competitive and it would've been competitive in those battleground states where the latino vote was decisive. and, finally, we have to stop being rockefeller republicans. we are not the party of the 47%. you know, when governor romney said what he did last week that obama won because it gives to latinos and other
in numbers left them vulnerable. throughout the first quarter century of u.s. independence, written and americans had chafed each other about the population, its regulation, its limitation. even as white americans claim to meet enslaved africans and african-americans, the people they labored for that covered indian land to support ever-growing numbers of the nation's people. the british interfered with then criticized u.s. lanes on both counts. on the continent, the british continue to cultivate diplomatic and economic ties -- ties with native american supporting the rival population for whom the united states perceived the greatest stress. on the ocean britain controlled atlantic shipping for bidding the atlantic slave trade after 18 seven and harassing the u.s. merchants. meanwhile, britain's traditional goal of population limitation, because usually the british thought on their small biothat they had too many people but the royal navy needed every hand he they could find on deck. the british practice supporting american ships to round up back the bond british seamen provoked enor
significant emphasis. for example, in 2010, the pentagon set up this u.s. cybercommand and the eu has a similar organization. the uk has the same thing. they have a cybersecurity operations center and this is the british equivalent in this area. let's just go through some of the terminology. i wanted to make sure that we have some particular knowledge about things. as i go through these special events, the backdoor is an overlooked entry into a network. it allows a hacker or someone were someone who was not authorized to be in there to get in with a password -- without a password. this is where you have a program that becomes a robot of the person on the outside. cookies are a friend when we are trying to order something. i'm going to give you some examples as we go. now where is malicious software. malware can be a virus 40 warm. we also have the concept where did these e-mails that are alluring you to respond. you might even respond to such a little ad. spearfishing is trying to get you to respond and it is that is the concept that it is targeted at you. because you have access to s
is hurting u.s. foreign policy objectives. and asian policy is a good place to rebuild i partisanship to the discussion is just under two hours. >> thank you all for being here this afternoon, and welcome to georgetown university. we've come together today for a special conversation, a conversation between top diplomats, past and present, each of whom has played a significant role in u.s. asia relations over the past two decades. with representatives from the administrations of george h. w. bush through the current administration of barack obama, our guest speakers today offer their expertise and experience as a look back on the use of service and look forward to the future of u.s.-asia relations. wish to offer my gratitude to georgetown's asian studies program, our school of foreign service, and the korea economic institute who have partnered to bring together some of our countries most respected minds on foreign policy and asia. we are deeply grateful to doctor victor cha a professor in government and asian studies and director of asian studies here in georgetown. carol lancaster, o
on a takedown of the treasury in the auto bailout. three guys earned $4.2 billion from the u.s. treasury. you remember that from the debate, right? no one asks, no one is answering that begin today, we got the confirmation from the romney campaign. now, what is this all about? and what does it have to do with the congo? i was reporting for bbc television and the guardian. when i found out that someone had figured out how to dip their hands, their claws into the foreign aid fund, the debt relief given to the republic of congo which is suffering a cholera epidemic. this money was intended to be used, $90 million intended to be used to in the cholera epidemic in the congo and yet it was waylaid by a bird of prey, a vulture, a vulture fund, a guide -- managed by a guy named paul singer. is other middle name is elliott. paul elliott singer who has accompanied by a good name of elliott management so i went up the congo river for abc television to find out what happened and i found elliott management had their claws around the cholera of money for the congo. we reported it on bbc television and the
, and if we don't tackle these threats, the u.s. and other nations will pay the price in the form of lost economic growth and development, stifled innovation and social progress and diminished opportunity. so i will describe those threats and talk about what needs to happen for us to keep the global internet on the right path. to harness the opportunities new communications, technologies to benefit all. there's a lot that about the relationship between communications technologies and world events, but in some important ways the relationship between the mutations, technology and world history has always been a profound one. the printing press was a new communications technology that changed the world. it won't take us back that far, but for a few minutes i will take us back 50 years to a powerfully important speech given by an fcc chairman in 1961. that made president john f. kennedy's. , newton minnow, spoke to the national association of broadcasting. his speech generally remembered for the declaration that tv had become a vast wasteland. but the speech, and i recommend reading it was ac
before we did the plan, the u.s. was a system of mexico with $36 million. here we are, this neighbor that's so important to us, we're assisting. at the same time, the united states will give 25 #% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federa
that there was a very large conspiracy, usually involving figures in the u.s. government, and a massive cover-up. >>> democratic national committee chairman wasserman-schultz celebrated gains for women in the election for the first time there are no all male state legislatures and 81 women in the u.s. house and 20 in the senate. representative wasserman-schultz spoke at an event hosted buy emily's list for about one hour and 20 minutes. >> since we have a devotee situated i realize we are a standing room only. it's great. thank you all for joining - stephanie schriock. [applause] and i am the president of emily's list. [applause] thank you on behalf of emily's list for joining us this morning. we are so, so excited to be here. can i just start by saying we won. [applause] and we won across the board. it was a historic night, just a little over a week ago, and we wanted to bring folks together today to share in a celebration but also to talk a little bit about what we learned through this election as we move forward. it's really about women, it's about moving voters and women candidates and th
to equip the new immigrants with the skills they need to make it in the u.s.. for example as richard mentioned by making sure that they and their children receive effective english language instruction. we tend to talk a lot about what to do about illegal immigrants who are already here whether to provide them with what some people call the legalization and other people call amnesty and on both sides lot of the arguments or moral. one group suggesting legalization would erode the rule will fall and another saying it's the status quo that undermines the rule of law and decides that he man to lead to a humanitarian duty to regulate the status of the people who come here over the last few decades. well, my own reading of the polls is that the answer is that people give to a lot of questions depend a lot on the wording of the question which suggests to me the polls are useful for identifying some impulses that are strong in the public and not so much for finding specific policies. the impression i have is that most people are not opposing the principal to allowing people who've been here
that is not a foreign policy. you know, it sounds like he's talking about the u.s. being out front first, and the you know, the rest being alone. i think this administration came in and found a number of our alliances and partnerships afraid in the post-iraq period because of, you know, the previous years and the previous administration. and i think this president has sought to adopt an approach to american leadership that really inspires and enabled others to step up and contribute alongside us. on the theory that that collective action on the part of the international community is much more effective in dealing with the kind of threats and challenges that we face today. you can see it in the 49 nation coalition that's been built in afghanistan. you can see it with regard to how we've gone after al qaeda globally with partners on the ground. we can see it in the most crippling sanctions regime ever put in place with regard to iran, where countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. a
talk about u.s. links to the drug war and the thing that is so impossible? you have to read it in some specific story and also find a back door, some different way into it. that is always an important piece of the puzzle. >> to look at another aspect of this, and citizens, witnessing with their cameras all over the world, i found myself thinking of those, everyone from folks in syria, in homes, trying to show what they could to focus here in oakland with camera phones, trying to show police misbehaving. someone who wrestled with the question of fact of journalism, how to protect people, whether they are citizens or professional. don't really have a big conversation about that. should there be an international standard of journalistic rights were if you are committing journalism you should be protected? out you protect those folks? >> good luck implementing that law. it is a great question, something journalists struggle with all time with a rise of social media and sites you have started out as a compendium of information, shootings in streets, be heading. started off like a visual wal
to the u.s. it's possible you could see the end of the arab spring at that conference held at columbus university in 2008. there's a matter of the public diplomacy people coming into the state department are often shunted off into consular work for eight years or whatever, for a long time before the ever get to any public diplomacy were. it's as though you're in the military and call your officers and send them off to, i don't know, do social work and then suddenly brought them back and said now you're in charge of the squadron. well anyway, but -- >> well, thank you, ambassador. and by the way, as far as the arab spring is concerned, i know that i was personally accused by some right wing bloggers having omitted the arab spring but i wish it were true, because of this event. although the event enabled me to do. the thing that was most fun of all of all the things that it did when i was undersecretary, which was that i got to call on the egyptian ambassador. i don't know if you really does, and made them come to my office and dressing gown which is sort of a great thing you can do trad
that there was a very large conspiracy usually involving figures in the u.s. government and a massive cover-up. >> literally 82 days. he presided over the seine at an hour days the vice president doesn't bother with that. he was there every day presiding everything from fdr with the transition of ciro knowledge. that doesn't happen anymore. got a phone call from the white house, get to the phone right away and at the other and they said get to the white house as soon as you can. so he grabbed his hat and he dashed out and he had a car of course he was to get upstairs to the second floor which was the family for and he looked up and said the president is dead and he was in total shock and he said what can i do for review and he said what can we do for you? you are in trouble now. >> we look at the life of harry truman now for our federal election commission chairman potter on super pacs and a discussion hosted by the atlantic, the astana institute and the newseum part of their washington ideas for rum. it's about a half-hour. >> so, next we are going to find out whether the billionaires' got
appointments, an inclination for restraint. i want to appoint judges who understand as a u.s. supreme court explained, that law is something more than the mere -- law is something more than mere will exerted as an act of power. if you think about being governor of a state like florida, your biggest legacy is probably your judges. we appointed about just over 80 judges now so far in 22 months, and so these are the individuals that are beginning to help -- decide whether we have three branches of government. i just remember civics, class, three branches of government, and i made sure everybody always remembers that in my state. the election is over. we may not be happy with the current occupant of the white house, but the question is what are we going to do about it? will you take action or stay on the sidelines? will you join the fight for conservative solutions with states like florida where we are fighting for families by creating jobs, quality education, and keeping the cost of living low? the time for arguing over who caused the problems has ended. now it is the time to break from the ca
about doing this with yemen, too which is of course in an area of the u.s. and saudi arabia to cooperate a lot on counterterrorism, on the gcc initiative to get the power not only the thing is how do you get this desperately poor country running out of everything all but once given the chance to get back on its feet. we are still working together on that. the big issues you to brief the next secretary on our iran sanctions and syria. the imposition of the current set of sanctions wouldn't have been possible without such a deal last november but if the sanctions led to iran losing up to or a little more than half of its oil exports, with saudi arabia be willing to step in and make those exports and i think with a caveat that we probably can't make up all of iran's exports whether it be a mechanism to totally shut them down because that would take the saudi production right up and leave no spare capacity which tends to be a driver for the higher oil prices. so, as the sanctions have come about, we had some bumps in the oil market particularly in the spring in anticipation, but as they've b
to be a bigger and more difficult issue and it deserves more than 10 seconds, but particularly the attacks on u.s. corporations and intellectual property is the core problem. on some national dialogue i think it's a very interesting interesting subject and a great question. i think there's a lot that could be done in the investment area and relating to that in the ipr area. it's been more successful at the subnational level than the national level. governors and china want to invest more than their national governments want to encourage it. and, perhaps you can use leverage to improve icr performance at the regional level in china which is where the real problem lies oic real possibilities here. >> please join me in thanking this terrific panel. [applause] >> could i just note it as was mentioned before we have a really exceptional book event opportunity nine days from that day in the afternoon on wednesday, november 28. we will be putting out an announcement. thank you. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversation
administration had against him, had tried against him. because syria was -- opposed the u.s. led invasion of iraq in 2003. the syrian government was looking the other way or even supporting jihaddists who were entering into iraq and killing american and allies forces. so the u.s. and syria were on opposite sides of the street, to say the least. he survived that. he survived the association with the assassination of former lebanese prime minister in february of 2005, in a damning un report that was leaked that held syria responsible. he survived all that and actually emerged in somewhat flying colors by 2008-2009, accepted back into the regional order, into the international community, even representatives at an anational plows meeting to jump start the arab-israeli peace talk. so i think he developed a sense of survivalism. he and his supporters. to the point where, when you have another challenge, and the most serious to date, obviously, since march 2011 and continuing today, that sense of triumphantism, that they're on the right side of history, sense of destiny, and i sincerely believe if i ta
question will go to representative berg. how would you have voted on the farm bill passed by the u.s. senate? in your view what are the necessary elements of a good farm bill? berg: certainly had said publicly. if there were the only choice i would support the farm bill. there are challenges with it. it links wetlands and crop insurance to a lot of people in north dakota. you know, my great-grandfather homestead in north dakota. i am an econ grad and i grew up in north dakota. my dad was a commissioner in agriculture is extremely important to me. what we need in agriculture and long term is we need the markets. we need the farm bill and a strong arm bill centered on crop insurance, absolutely no question that we need to ensure that open markets and a place is the price we need for a great quality crops in north dakota. the challenge we have in the house is the house ag committee pass the farm bill as well. that did not come out of the chamber and didn't come to the floor and i thought back -- fought back against republican leadership very hard on that specific thing. i worked biparti
, tunisia and egypt. the u.s. institute of peace post this to our discussion. >> good morning, everyone. i am steven heydemann, middle east initiative at the u.s. institute of peace and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those who rsvp may have been scared away by the false rumor that you would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that's not the case that you don't need to worry about that. were very pleased to have you out here with this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the security sectors in the arab world over the coming year or so, and by security service, i mean the police, the armed forces and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus is that exist in every arab country, that what happens with those sectors of the bureaucracy in the arab world will let her sleep determined the fate of
. you have been quoted as saying that there are very likely as many or more spies working against u.s. interests inside the u.s. during the cold war, which was a head snapping quote when i read it. who are these people and what are they after? >> i don't know that. i've been on the government for six years, but if you look at the value of intelligence, importance of intelligence in the expenditures of resources by china, by russia, but others and look for them is one of the biggest is. well it's the u.s. not only national security secrets, the commercial seats as be of much of can be gleaned or stolen from cyberspace. it is a dire threat in part because we shifted so much attention, so much resource and the counterterrorism arena we've forgotten the necessity of old-fashioned counterintelligence and that's an important element of this. >> often i've heard some people involved in counterintelligence tends to be seen as the redheaded stepchild of the intelligence world. why is that when we need it and what is the cure for a? effect in part because it's something we don't want to think a
that we're going. as the largest fuel consumer in the world today and by far the largest in the u.s. government, as i said, 93%, the department of defense has a special role to play, and moreover, because of our dependence on foreign sources of energy we continually send our men and women in uniform in harm's way to maintain that access to oil. the second criticism we often hear is that biofuels are too expensive. now, it is true that advanced biofuels are not yet in full production and so they can't compete with oil, since the oil market is a hundred years old, but d.o.d. investment has caused the price to drop dramatically over the last two years, and biofuels are more immune from price shots than -- than oil. there are also significant costs to traditional foreign sources of energy that are not shown at the gas pump. those costs are associated with protecting our shipping lanes and oil supplies and for over 60 years we've been trolling the -- patrolling the persian gulf, these costs for oil remain underappreciated. for our military the issue of energy security investment in biofu
in this age moving forward there are some elements of cooperation with labor migration. u.s. imports 2 million immigrants this is a trend that will increase. of course, some 10 trees it matters more. >> i would agree there is no appetite for a plush former integration our bilateral engagement. of the same could be said for china are other countries in asia. there are rumors floating around they try to have the unprecedented meeting of all heads the state's in his similar in the caribbean with a strong component that china can cooperate with every 10 but not economic engagement in particular. >> [laughter] that is the next summit of the america is. >> i am proud and honored to introduce two individuals. he is a former staff sergeant of the united states army. he is the first living person to receive the armed forces medal of honor for actions that occurred after the and vietnam war perry dead -- be it now war. the major general was awarded the united states highest military decoration for heroic actions in 1968 during the vietnam war. he served on active duty in the marine corps over 33 years b
on the u.s. military and diplomatic officials, to keep us safe and well. 9/11 brought terrorism to our homeland. two wars in iraq and afghanistan have placed around 60 million people in the taliban military. the current outbreak of new, dangerous infectious disease test our ability of strength. the commitment of america's health challenges on hiv/aids, malaria has elevated global health to a new and costly u.s. foreign policy subjective. for the leaders, using these commitments is not only the right thing to do but make sense at a strategic level. >> security has very closely tied together a very basic level we've recognized the health of the country is clearly linked to their prosperity and their productivity and their economic well-being. that is key to the stability. >> here at csis the one to understand the decade teach about the nexus between health and security. the senior men and women in our government and military have grappled with these issues. admiral william fallon, former head of both u.s. pacific and central command, spearheaded military engagement during a 48 year caree
and jim johnson. we have jim shelton, at the u.s. department of the education. the department, jim manages most of the competitive programs including i-3 and promise neighborhoods. previously he served as program direct or for education at the bill and melinda gates foundation and was the east coast lead for new schools venture fund and co-founder of learn now. finally with have with us eric westendorf, cofound other and ceo of learnzillion. eric incubated the learnzillion at haines public charter school in washington, d.c., one of of the highest performing charter schools where wes was chief academic officer and principal. let's get started. eric, and raquel i will ask you guys to go ahead and kick this off. real simple question. both of you are executives at for-profit education companies. we just heard parent revolution point out that the challenge with for-profits perhaps stakeholders will take precedence every the kids. why do education as a for-profit rather than a nonprofit? eric? >> great. so, let me, let me first start by just saying what learnzillion is and then answer the questi
of guard and reserve and u.s. army reserve. i mean guard, and active reductions as we go forward. how do i look at this? this characteristic that is important. people get confused with what is going on in the last five years and what we want to have in the future. in my mind, what happened in iraq and afghanistan is exact to how we have designed it to happen. the active component responded initially and was able to get things established and then as we needed more depth we were able to move into the national guard and u.s. army reserve to help us and it's gained that now significant amount of experience. that works very well. the ways we are organized now in the army, there are some reserve and national guard units that have to be ready to deploy very quickly. those tend to be combat service support outfits and combat support outlets that require much less training capability because the guard and reserve, the issue is time. it's not money, it's time. they only have so much time to sustain regiments to the characteristics of an active component is rapidly deployable, higher readiness able
, and as recently as the 1990s, that number would have been in the 20s. u.s. exports in ten years went from 25% to developing countries to 50%. combined with what we heard about europe and in a sense the demographic problems in japan, there's a shift in the international system you're going on, and a lot of those countries will also have challenges like in china with avoiding the middle income trap and the structural shift, but what i want to connect to is this stuff we're doing at home in the united states is not enough. the united states then needs an international economic strategy, some of the things that prime minister asner talked about so it leverages a domestic revival with a new international growth system because the old system is no longer going to exist in the old form, and we got rising economies, and you got markets there, africa grew at 5% a year for the decade before the crisis and now back on the growth progeek story. there's potential in all of them. >> can they keep up the pace of growth they demonstrated in the last ten years? we're already seeing china slow down. the last
candidates for u.s. senate. rick berg and heidi heitkamp. i'm stacy sturm with the league of women voters, and i will be your moderator this evening. joining me on the panel is the special sections editor for the bismarck tribune and lawrence king, an attorney and also a member of the bismarck school board. this evening's debate takes place at horizon middle school in bismarck and has been organized by the league of women voters. it's co-sponsored by dakota media access and the bismarck tribune. the league of women voters is a nonpartisan organization and promotes the informed participation of all citizens in their government. this is intended to be a respectful exchange of ideas. our purpose this evening is to provide voters with information about the candidates and their positions on the issues that affect the people of north dakota. the audience here tonight is asked to, please, reserve applause or any reaction or comments until the forum has ended. tonight's debate forum will be as follows: each candidate will have 90 seconds to respond to each question. following responses to the que
, not the u.s. government, because i'm about to hammer them. we do not have the kind of leadership that required to have coalitions put together to deal with this situation. it is a soft power or hard power. and it may not happen properly anytime in the near future your remember that caveat. now, the other day i was reading through a book by save the children. it's about the children of syria. and if you haven't read this book and you want to understand what's happening in syria, i recommend you read it. but i assure you, you will feel very uncomfortable on page one. there are costs involved with the situation that could go on for generations, not just for now. generations. think about the children are going through now and how they will think about the west. the international community, their arab brothers, the reins, the russians, the chinese, the united states, and just about everyone else. even if this might be over in the next year or so, it will definitely not be over for those children. thank you. [applause] >> thank you. ambassador? >> i agree with most of what i heard from
for the use of military force may be construed to authorize the detention of u.s. citizens or lawful resident aliens who are captured inside the united states unless -- and this is a big "unless" -- an act of congress expressly authorizes such detention. as i read the amendment, it says that the military detention of u.s. citizens may be authorized in accordance with the law of war as long as this action is expressly authorized by congress. further, the amendment's requirement for express authorization applies only to the detention of u.s. citizens who are captured inside the united states, so no such authorization would be required for detention of a u.s. citizen in the course of military operations overseas. i believe it is appropriate that congress focus on the issue of military detention at the time that they authorize the use of military force. as would be required by the feinstein amendment. as the supreme court has stated, detention is a fundamental and accepted incident to armed conflict. without such authority, our armed services could be put in the untenable position of being able t
is currently -- today he's the chief legal adviser of the u.s. state department. in other words, he advises the president on what international law. he's the american spokesman on international law. he was the dean of yale law school. he gave a major speech last week at georgetown law. harold coe wrote, quote: domestic courts must play a major role in coordinating u.s. domestic constitutional rules with the rules of foreign and international law to advance the broader development of a well-functioning international judicial system. well, think about that for a minute. american courts can't coordinate the law from international law. they won't have much influence over bear national law and foreign law, but they can coordinate american law. that's the influence american courts have. so in other words by definition, if this is true, if we coordinate american law with foreign international law, he would have to subordinate american law to foreign international law. it's the only way this would logically work. the fourth person i'm going to talk about for a minute is anne marie slaughter. she wa
, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector reform and egypt would weaken the security service more than it already is because there's been very little security sector reform as i don't see evidence of that. but also some of these the assumption that you are necessarily going after the leaders inside the security sector or security sector reform i think is a misconce
nations, was the weight to get alongside these afghans, and we saw -- i was in kabul when the two u.s. officers were shot in the national military police coordination center in the moi. there was an absolute bizarre for those who were present on the day to -- doug touched on this as proximity with the afghans, and it's very often the best form of defending against this form of attack. >> [inaudible] >> general, will you be able to achieve a successful withdrawal of u.k. combat troops by the end of 2014. >> i absolutely understand the investments, and there's a lot of material. my headquarters absolutely understand how much we have got to move over the time? >> the overall general plan of withdrawal, will you be able to be successful do you think? >> yes, i will. noting, of course, that the national operation is inside a wider nato operation, and a great deal of work is being done in nato to deliver that coordination. >> thanks. >> i want the to ask along the table, are we seriously led to believe that on the january the 1st, 2015, that the afghan national security forces will be susta
, it was a state was created out of new york and new hampshire. they fought over it. it has its reflection in the u.s. constitution. the article on the closet talks about how states will be made in the constitution, is merely a result of the conflict that we had with new hampshire and vermont. how is vermont going to be a separate state? so we had have that influence on the constitution making of that country. the cover image is a detail. if you look at the whole of it, it has everything about vermont that we need to know. it has an industry going there. it has a church and a meeting house. it has a microcosmic view of what the state is about. the mountains have not only been a geographic figure, but it is an agricultural state. everything that is going on in the state, it is somehow captured. it became the perfect image for we are trying to accomplish in the book by showing the variety. not this one thing, the connectedness to the east and the west end an important part of the development that goes on. it might surprise people about vermont in this one marvelous painting. >> in 1927, a flood caused
've run out of steam. >> i feel like i'm back in the u.s. election talking about the travails of the 1%. let's broaden the discussion. we'll bring in some more diverse voices from different people, different is. anybody want to enter the conversation, just raise your hand, calling you. people with makes will state their, affiliation and ask a question or make a comment. any questions or comments from the floor? yes, over here. >> thank you. i would like to ask you the following question. you have mentioned a number of tools such as cyberweapons, such as drones and special forces. they are not in themselves. they are just tools. to achieve what is the big issue it was a smart move, but he didn't resolve the iranian problems. same for other places. so my question is, don't you think that there is some kind of an biggie t. trying to use new, smart technology, that kind of stuff, pretending to get solutions and at the same time, let's say the political diplomatic approach doesn't provide solution in the end. so, isn't it a signal that we are shifting from her politics and diplomacy and rel
as an illinois state senator, in the u.s. senator, and when you read the audacity of hope, his book about his all-together brief senate career. it's clear he's not an ideolog. i -- i always thought that, you know, the idea of him as a socialist or whatever was just a smear. >> how did he get painted that way, or was there an element of truth to it? >> this is quite a bit about what the next book is about -- >> margaret talked bow -- >> the smear, there was a concerted effort started even before he became president, but really accelerated in 2009 to destroy him politically for the purposes of regaining power, and so it was not a conspiracy, but there were a lot of people who had, you know, a similar interest in trying to paint him as something that he was not. i mean, we all know about the whole birther movement and everything. one of the amazing parts about that is that how far it moved into the mainstream where you could hear nonsense on the floor of the congress or from board rooms. i mean, if you stop -- we're so used to it, we don't stop to think about how completely insane it is. what would
a membership organization. our website is www.eps u.s.a..org. and i would invite all of you who are here and all who may be watching to visit the website. and if you share the goals and objectives of the organization to join us, or to lend us your support. we have a great advantage in privilege of having a very strong supporter and great friend in bernard schwartz, after whom this symposium is named. bernard planned to be here this morning, was not able to get here, but i do want to say that we at eps are tremendously appreciative of the bernard, of your encouragement and your backing over quite a long time now, and though this symposium series. -- and other this symposium series. strip to essentials, the fiscal cliff is a device constructed in effect of course a rollback of social security, medicare, medicaid, among other programs. as the price of avoiding tax increases and disruptive cuts in federal civilian and in the military, it was partly fortuitous, given the expiration dates of the tax cut, but also partly policymaking by hostagetaking, timed for this moment following the 2012 el
, but that all changed for me in october of 2008 when i got a call from my boss, u.s. attorney, mike garcia. he called me in the office, and i have the oh, my god, it's the principal's office feeling in the pit of the stomach. he handed me a printout, special inspector general, it was a piece of the legislation that congress passed authorizing treasury to borrow $700 billion to rescue wall street, bail out the banks, put us on a path supposedly to economic recovery. this piece i was not aware of was when they passed the law, congress created a brand new agency. when mike explained to me what was the agency was going to do, two functions, one a law enforcement agency, a fbi for the t.a.r.p. with guns, badges, special agents, knocking down doors, executing search warrants, taking criminals out of their homes, putting them in cuffs, and in jail. congress realized pushing out so much money it was inevitably going to draw criminal flies to the government honey, and they needed a law enforcement agency to protect the money. second was oversight to bring transparency giving reports to congress and to
the canopy which in the u.s. economy be the big firms, ge, gm, wal-mart, all that. then he got the small business. but it's the small and growing permit the things that were small but can challenge the big and it's what happens in the big tree falls over. new trees to read out of it, right out of the old tree. it is a metaphor, but it's real. when we lose something in the economy, it's vital we reconfigure resources and create something new out of it. so do we need control? we need feedback. we need the capability to repurpose. in this country, we need to build a robust platform for people to realize what they have incited that. that is why people came to this country and that is why people here look for a better future will be like a better future feature their ancestors looked to when they came. so i would say yes, you know, we need control, but we need controls. all kind of interdependencies and self-regulation, what's working, what's not what gets us to the endpoint, which is better may take human lives. it's not gdp, not increase transactions. it's what kind of lives we live. >> hos
talking to professors or authors we're at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis merrill lynch. with professor aaron o'connell also the author of this book "underdogs" the making of the modern marine corps." professor when was the marine corps established? >> 1775 but the birthday is us mess. the record always claims november but that is the date that congress authorized but they never raised the battalion raised then. >> day never were. but the first goes then 28 november but 10 november still celebrated as a birthday. >>host: what was the purpose of the marine corps? >> to be the guard on a ship to protect the officers from the crew it was difficult to salish up they had to have people there so the principal job was to be the ship's guard and served and snipers but it is a very small part of the navy. >> this -- record is complete the service? >> separate inside the navy but they would claim when they served aboard they should follow the rules amadeus served ashore to follow the regulations of the
>> the u.s. defense agency has said information and intelligence are the fire and maneuver of the 21st century. those of you who are familiar with more fighting back since with pakistan, iraq and afghanistan know how important this has become but though one raid did iraq where operator seized the computer equivalent of the rolodex negative a rolodex that tracked 500 al qaeda suicide bombers or terrace filtered into iraq through syria. but the database of 500 individuals that were recruited to blow themselves up was critical with the effort to take al qaeda at it is in mesopotamia apart inside iraq. >> the mother lode of documents seized that has been known as the sinjar parade illustrates the point* nicely made by lt. general lewis, or flynn six years after a 9/11 attacks that intelligence committees representing a wide variety of agencies, but notorious and secret, had been collaborating on the unprecedented capability to crush the terrorist networks. addition to the special ops they used supercomputers and custom software for deployed a skilled and list and to charge just
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